Wednesday, 15 March 2017

Walter Greiner 1935 - 2016

I don't think I posted anything here last year noting the death of Walter Greiner.  He was a major figure in nuclear physics in all the time I've been doing it, and someone closely related to people I have had close links with research-wise, though I only actually bumped into him a couple of times that I remember.  

Anyway, I notice that the European Physical Society posted an obituary of him earlier this month, so rather than attempt to write a potted biography of someone I knew mostly through second-hand observations,  I direct interested readers to the EPS obituary.

Tuesday, 14 March 2017

Machiavellian spot-the-difference

This is somewhat off-topic, but I wonder if readers have ever noticed the similarity in appearance between Florentine politico Machiavelli, whose most famous work advocated acting immorally if it achieves the desired political ends, and contemporary politician Jeremy Hunt, who has governmental responsibility for looking after the NHS?

MachiavelliHunt

Wednesday, 8 March 2017

Euroschool on Exotic Beams

I notice that the latest in the series of Euroschools on Exotic Beams is open for registration.  It is a summer school intended for PhD students and young researchers working on nuclear physics involving radioactive ion beams.  If you are such a person reading this, then follow the link above to have a look and consider applying to attend.  There are a great range of lecturers covering experimental and theoretical aspects, and spending a few days in Normandy in late summer can't be the worst thing to do.  

The Euroschool series has a great history of publishing the lecture notes and making them freely available.  If you follow the link above you can easily find them.  They are a great resource for graduate level nuclear physics study, covering a very broad range of topics.  It also includes one instance of my friend and colleague Wilton Catford citing a certain R. A. Zimmerman.

Wednesday, 1 March 2017

Ludvig Faddeev (1934 – 2017)

I saw from a friend's Facebook post that Ludvig Faddeev, known to me for his eponymous equations, died a couple of days ago.

Faddeev was a mathematician and physicist whose work is of great importance in few-body nuclear physics.  In particular, he developed a method for solving the quantum three-body problem that can be used when studying, e.g the triton or 3He, but also weakly-bound nuclei in which there is 2-neutron halo along with a strongly-bound core, such as 11Li. 

At this point I have to confess that I have never tried solving the Faddeev equation myself, though this blog post is tempting me to do so.  If someone reading would like to write a quick primer, then I'd be more than happy to post it here.

Friday, 24 February 2017

Bright Club #12

A series of reminder emails are doing their job in reminding me that I am going to be one of the participants in Bright Club #12, which is happening quite soon, on March 9th in the Boilerroom in Guildford.  Bright Club, for the uninitiated is a stand-up comedy event where the performers work in academia.  The name is a bit show-offy for my liking.  Like joining Mensa or something.  But it's an okay pun on Fight Club, so okay.  Anyway, if you want to come and see me, and my absent sense of embarrassment standing up and attempting to be funny, along with some other more competent people, then tickets are available here.

I might start a rival event called Shite Club.


Monday, 20 February 2017

Fusion 17

I'm at the FUSION17 conference in Hobart, Tasmania.  At the beginning of today's session I tweeted, using the hashtag #fusion17 not realising that it had already been used by a party being organised in Texas this spring break (see attached picture).  Oh well.

The conference is one of a series which has been going for 20 years to bring together people working on nuclear reaction mechanisms which lead to fusion.  That's a somewhat minor part of what I do, though what I do doesn't really fall within any one specialist conference series, so it's about as on-topic as most conferences I ever go to.  The fact that I know quite a few of the people here is probably a sign that I belong sufficiently well enough to attend.  

We're about half way through day one, and as usual, the conference talks have filled me with enthusiasm for the research area, and given me lots of ideas of calculations to perform.  I was also pleased and somewhat embarrassed to see my name in the talk by Michael Thoennessen in which he listed the names of all attendees at the conference who were co-authors on papers which announced the discovery of new isotopes.  I have 4 written next to my name, apparently being a co-discoverer of four isotopes.  I can't claim to have been on the experiment(s) leading to these discoveries, but I was involved enough in some of the calculations associated with them to be on the discovery papers.